What to do when our schools run out of the teachers they urgently need

By Linda Hobbs, Russell Tytler, Peta White and Jill Brown

When faced with a teacher shortage, often schools need to ‘make do’ and ask teachers to teach away from their area of expertise in order to staff classes. That’s called teaching out-of-field and sometimes teachers, put in that position, can feel unsupported and overwhelmed. The issue of teaching ‘out-of-field’ persists in Australia and internationally – 

Australian curriculum review: strengthened but still a long way from an amazing curriculum for all Australian students

By Stewart Riddle

There is much to admire in the proposed revisions to the Australian Curriculum, which were released for public consultation this week. I’d give it a B+. The curriculum content organisers and core ideas have been revised to ensure that they are more closely aligned, with some trimming of content to enable greater depth of study.

Meet our remarkable guardians of play, protecting children from screens

By Vicki Schriever

Digital technologies are a prominent and integral feature of daily living and are present in our homes, educational settings and communities. This week research from the Gonski Institute for Education at UNSW revealed parents see digital devices as necessary for their kids’ learning but worry about the distraction and activities they’re missing out on. So how

Five questions to ask if you think teaching problem-solving works

By John Sweller

Every few decades there is a campaign to include general problem-solving and thinking skills in school curricula. The motivation is understandable. Everyone would like our schools to enhance students’ critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Because it is so obviously important for students to have such skills, these campaigns are frequently successful in including thinking and

How to do the sums for an excellent maths curriculum

By Kathryn Holmes and Catherine Attard

As we await the release of a new Australian curriculum for mathematics, debates about its contents are developing. As is typical with educational debates, the issues are often painted in binary terms: traditional vs progressive, explicit teaching vs problem solving, content vs skills, procedural vs conceptual knowledge. In mathematics education, these debates have existed for

Teachers do not want or need another review. Trust is proven to work.

By Christine Cunningham, Maggie McAlinden, Michelle Striepe, Donna Barwood,Christa Norris, Madlen Griffiths, Zina Cordery, Wei Zhang.

Christine Cunningham, Maggie McAlinden, Michelle Striepe, Christa Norris, Madlen Griffiths, Zina Cordery, Wei Zhang. We are a group of exhausted expert teacher educators from Edith Cowan University in Perth, Western Australia with a long and proud history following in the footsteps of Edith Cowan who did so much to improve the lives of women, the

There’s an urgent need to teach empathy but not everyone will connect or care

By Amanda Keddie

Sometimes our frames of reference are too narrow and limited for us to comprehend alternative ways of knowing and being. Our frames of reference limit our capacity to empathise. So, is it possible to teach empathy? Empathy training has featured in the news media recently as a way to begin remedying the abhorrent sexual misconduct

Online learning will never be a substitute for face-to-face

By Andrew Norton

In 2020 higher education student satisfaction with their ‘entire educational experience’ hit its lowest point since Australia’s national survey of current students began in 2011. But the detailed survey results, which cover many aspects of student life, paint a mixed picture. Despite an unexpected shift to online learning due to COVID-19 restrictions, satisfaction with many