How to reimagine research for self-determined Indigenous futures

By Nikki Moodie

An excerpt from Associate Professor Nikki Moodie’s keynote, opening the 2021 AARE conference on Monday November 29. Indigenous

How strong schools became the backbone of the juggle struggle

By Raechel Johns and Rebecca English

When state premiers came out and said that schools were going to close in March of 2020, there

Who stands to benefit? We all need to know

By Emma Rowe

Some of the richest and most powerful individuals and corporations in Australia are involved in educational philanthropy –

How to bridge the teacher and academic divide online

By Steven Kolber and Keith Heggart

The Problem & the Proposal  One of the most widely accepted facts in education is that teachers and

One powerful way to beat the trauma of school transition with joy and fun

By Michael Anderson and Peter O'Connor

On the Monday post lockdown, schools again reverberated with the sounds of all their kids in the playground. In this pandemic much has changed but perhaps none more than schools and the work of teachers. For many parents, teachers and students there will be justifiable anxiety about what students have missed out on. There will

The truth about Terra Nullius and why First Nations people say Tudge is wrong to say we need optimism

By Olivia Johnston, Libby Jackson-Barrett and Christine Cunningham

Australia’s federal Minister for Education, Alan Tudge, will not endorse the  draft national curriculum for secondary teachers of Humanities and Social Sciences (HASS) because  the changes are “overly negative”and could teach kids a hatred of their Country” (ABC 2021).   But from a First Nations perspective, the time has come to speak the truth about what

Why Alan Tudge is now on the history warpath

By Naomi Barnes

Australian children will never defend the country if the draft history curriculum is adopted. That’s the takeaway from the Federal Education Minister Allan Tudge’s speech to the Centre for Independent Studies (CIS) on Friday.  The minister called for yet another curriculum reform to ensure “a positive, optimistic view of Australian history”.  His reasoning? “Individual students

We struggled to make university more equal. Has that battle for equality worked now?

By Ian Li

Australian education policy has really focussed on getting  ‘equity groups’ into university and then onto completion with initiatives designed to improve access and participation. That worked.  Recent data indicate that there has been growth in the university enrolment of these equity groups in the past ten years. Published studies have also found evidence for comparable

Have we lost trust in science?

By Natasha Rooney

Trust in Science, Society, and the Australian State: A Crisis in the Making? “The return to school has

Playground duty really is quality time: how joyful learning happens outside the classroom

By Olivia Karaolis

The Quality Time Action Plan is described by the department of education as an approach intended to reduce and simplify administrative processes for teachers and provide them with more time for “high value tasks”.  It is here that I have a quibble with this document and its definition of playground duty or supervision at lunch