Digital footprint of children: latest research on the issues and implications

By Rachel Buchanan

Australian children are among the youngest and most prolific users of the internet in the world. They are, on average, a little under eight years old when they begin using the internet and most go online daily. So it is not long before they develop an extensive digital footprint. But not much is known about

VET FEE-HELP as a driver of ethical dilemmas for vocational education teachers

By Sonal Nakar

The government loan scheme that helps eligible vocation education and training (VET) students pay their tuition fees, called

So who wants to teach these days? (Be surprised)

By Jennifer GORE and Rosie Joy BARRON, Kathryn HOLMES and Maxwell SMITH

The quality of teachers is a growing focus of educational reform around the world, with new policies attempting to ensure that only the ‘best and brightest’ are selected for the teaching profession. In Australia the push is evident in government policy that is increasingly imposing regulations, at both national and state and territory levels, on

This is what we need to do to boost languages learning in Australian schools

By Michiko Weinmann and Ruth Arber

Our rich multicultural nation maintains a frustratingly monolingual mindset. Discussions about Languages education in Australia typically reiterate the

This is what primary school children think about NAPLAN

By Angelique Howell

There are no obvious consequences for poor National Assessment Program: Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) performance by individual children. So the notion that children should not be too stressed about doing the tests is not uncommon. However, as I see it, the idea that NAPLAN is a low-stakes test is an adult idea. It imposes an

‘Naughty’ classes are wrong: here’s what the research says

By Linda Graham

A primary school in Victoria made the news recently when it created a separate “naughty-naughty” class for children experiencing learning and behavioural difficulties. It is not the first school to have done this and it is unlikely to be the last. Separate special educational settings are administratively attractive because resources can be consolidated and the

Australian Professional Standards for Teachers are useful to teacher education students, here’s how

By Tony Loughland and Neville John Ellis

There is a strong critique of the impacts of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers from educational researchers.

Teacher research and why it is more important than ever for our schools

By Sue Nichols and Phil Cormack

Is teacher research still important and relevant? In the 1970s, the Bay Area Writing Project in the United

National Evidence Base for educational policy: a good idea or half-baked plan?

By James Ladwig

The recent call for a ‘national education evidence base’ by the Australian Government came as no surprise to Australian educators. The idea is that we need to gather evidence, nationally, on which education policies, programs and teaching practices work in order for governments to spend money wisely on education. There have long been arguments that