Chinese students perceptions of a joint master's of education degree offered by China and Canada

Year: 2013

Author: Wang, Fang, Clarke, Anthony

Type of paper: Abstract refereed

Abstract:
More than at any other time, governments and higher education institutions acknowledge the need to internationalize institutions in the pursuit of global partnerships for education (Ramachandran, 2011; Fahey, 2007). With the number of joint programs in teacher education increasing each year (Hall, 2007) and attempts to provide the best possible experience for international students (Ingrisano & Fernadez, 2013), this study follows a cohort of Chinese graduate students enrolled in a two-year joint Master's of Education (M.Ed.) degree program offered by a Northeast Normal University (NENU), China, and the University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada.  

The focus of this study is fourteen Chinese students enrolled in the program from September, 2011, through to August, 2013.  The students completed 4 courses at NENU before applying and being admitted to UBC where they completed the remaining 6 courses of their M.Ed. degree.  Three research questions guided this study and explored the M.Ed. experience from the students' perspective: (1) What is the nature and substance of the learning experience in a joint international graduate degree program?; (2) What are the advantages and disadvantages (both anticipated and unanticipated) encountered during this program?; and (3) In what ways are the students' conceptions of education (teaching and learning) supported, challenged, or dismissed as they move between the two international contexts of the program?

The researchers collected data from the members of the cohort on four occasions at six-month intervals over the course of the 24-month program, beginning at the start of the program.  The data included both interviews and surveys and was analyzed using the constant comparative method to determine key themes representing the Chinese students' M.Ed. experience.  Key themes emerging from the data include: cultural over-compensation, erroneous second-language learner assumptions; unanticipated national versus international distinctions, and student displacement anxiety (before, during, and after the program).  These themes and others are taken in a broader discussion attempts to highlight the interplay between ‘educative agenda' versus the ‘system of schooling' (Fenstemacher, 1992) in teacher education that characterized of the international students' experience.  Further the outcomes of this study illustrate: (1) the value of international student experience as a way of confronting, or problematizing conceptions of teaching and learning for all involved; and (2) an potential analytical framework and set of principles for examining international joint programs in teacher education. 

Back