PRACTICES AND STRATEGIES USED BY NEW ZEALAND TEACHERS OF READING IN CONTEXT: Results from the I.E.A. Reading Literacy Study

Year: 1992

Author: Chamberlain, Glenn

Type of paper: Abstract refereed

Abstract:
How is reading taught in the classroom? What sort of techniques and methods do teachers use? Do teachers have an overall aim in mind when they are engaged in their day-to-day reading activities? From self- reported instructional practices and strategies is there one particular theoretical philosophy which is more apparent in terms of what the majority of teachers are doing? There is little doubt that the teacher plays an influential role in the development of pupils' reading achievement (Department of Education, 1985, Durkin, 1980, and Rupley et al, 1986). Outside of the home, the teacher is the one person with whom pupils' spend a significant amount of time in developing their reading. The role model teachers present in relation to good reading habits is vital in the formation and maintaining of a positive and genuine interest in reading amongst pupils. This paper highlights some of the findings to emerge from the recent I.E.A. Study of Reading Literacy. Specifically, it will focus on the practices and strategies used by New Zealand standard 3 (9-year-olds) teachers in their teaching of reading and literacy. This will be discussed in relation to recent developments in reading research. Twenty-seven countries took part in the study at this level, and where appropriate, international comparisons have been included.

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