The experiences of pre-service teachers in addressing the Australian Professional Standards: A systematic review of the literature

Year: 2019

Author: Allen, Jeanne

Type of paper: Abstract refereed

Abstract:
This paper has been conceptualised with a view to identifying and elucidating key themes emerging from research about the experiences of pre-service teachers in addressing the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (APST). Although teacher standards have shaped teacher education and teaching in various ways for some time, they have been developed and endorsed at the national level only since 2011. It is timely, therefore, to investigate the impact of the APST on the experiences of pre-service teachers as they transition through their initial teacher education programs towards the Graduate career stage. This paper makes a contribution through presenting a review of the research findings generated to date on this topic. A systematic literature review, being finalised at the time of writing, has been designed in response to the question, What are the reported experiences of pre-service teachers in addressing the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers? The review spans the period of 2011 to 2019 and uses systematic and specific methods to locate, select and critically evaluate research pertinent to the topic, and to synthesise findings from those studies deemed appropriate for inclusion in the review. Qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods studies are included. Following an approach proposed by researchers including Gough, Oliver and Thomas (2012), the emergent findings are categorised into a number of key themes, which are discussed in this paper. The focus and relevance of this work to the Teacher Education and Research Innovation SIG and conference theme lies in its elucidation of factors emerging from the literature that impact on the professional lives of pre-service teachers in the twenty-first century. Questions of social justice and equity, in terms of levels of access, resourcing and engagement associated with meeting the APST, emerge from the review and are critically considered and discussed in this paper.

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