The surprising history of sexual obsession in our schools

By Naomi Barnes, Elizabeth Knight and Melanie Myers

Why are some independent Christian schools so obsessed with sex and should taxpayers be paying for it? These two questions were raised on Monday night by Australian flagship current affairs program, Four Corners, which broadcast an expose on schools associated with Catholic sect Opus Dei. The report made shocking allegations about pastoral processes and the

It would be so much better if we taught two ways. Here’s why

By Andrew J. Martin, Paul Ginns, Robin P. Nagy, Rebecca J. Collie and Keiko C.P. Bostwick

From one school year to the next, students experience an escalation in the amount and difficulty of schoolwork.  Researchers have tried to identify instructional approaches which would  reduce the cognitive burden on students, especially when they are in the early stages of learning—such as when they start a new academic year, a new subject, a

When school’s in a caravan on the road to an astonishing world

By Rebecca English, Katie Burke and Naomi Dale

One of the more reported side-effects of the COVID disruption has been the increase in families choosing to educate their children outside of mainstream schools (see the latest Queensland homeschooling statistics as an example of the growth in families choosing to exit the school system). While home education, frequently called homeschooling, has seen incredible growth

International Day of Education: why Jason Clare and Sussan Ley must get to class immediately

By Helen Cozmescu

“Today at school I will learn to read at once; then tomorrow I will begin to write, and

Education: the five concerns we should debate right now

Meghan Stacey on the trouble with teaching Deb Hayes on making school systems more equitable. Phillip Dawson on how we should treat ChatGPT. Sarah O’Shea on widening participation at university. Scott Eacott on the Productivity Commission’s review of the National School Reform Agreement. The trouble with teaching by Meghan Stacey Last year was a big

To save democracy, we need to flip the system

By Cameron Paterson

In her book Teacher, Gabbie Stroud beautifully encapsulates what is happening by stealth to the teaching profession: “Good teaching …comes from teachers who know their students, who build relationships, who meet learners at their point of need and who recognize that there’s nothing standard about the journey of learning. We cannot forget the art of

How teachers can change our world for the better

Hello and happy new year. We start 2023 with a first for the blog: Nina Burridge and John Buchanan in conversation on Teachers as Changemakers in an Age of Uncertainty from the book Empowering Teachers and Democratising Schooling. Nina: What is a good education in the current context? What are your thoughts on this?  John:

Happy new year reading: our most popular posts of all time

By Jenna Price

EduResearch Matters began back in 2014 under the stewardship of the amazing Maralyn Parker. At the end of 2020, Maralyn retired and I tried to fill very big shoes. The unusual thing about EduResearch Matters is that even posts published in the first couple of years of the blog’s existence continue to get readers –

Top of the pops: AARE’s Hottest Ten 2022

Thank you to all our contributors in 2022. We published over 100 blog posts this year from academics

Indigenous voices: why we urgently need windows and mirrors

By Amy Thomson

Could you see yourself reflected in your English classroom? I would like you to take yourself back in time for a moment. Take yourself back to your high school English classroom. I want you to imagine the books you studied. Think of their titles and who they were by. Think about what you learnt and