NAPLAN

Happy new year reading: our most popular posts of all time

By Jenna Price

EduResearch Matters began back in 2014 under the stewardship of the amazing Maralyn Parker. At the end of 2020, Maralyn retired and I tried to fill very big shoes. The unusual thing about EduResearch Matters is that even posts published in the first couple of years of the blog’s existence continue to get readers –

AARE 2022: That’s a wrap for a spectacular conference

By Sally Larsen

It goes without saying that it’s been a difficult few years for in-person conferences. I’m sure many of

The good, the bad and the pretty good actually

By Sally Larsen

Every year headlines proclaim the imminent demise of the nation due to terrible, horrible, very bad NAPLAN results. But if we look at variability and results over time, it’s a bit of a different story. I must admit, I’m thoroughly sick of NAPLAN reports. What I am most tired of, however, are moral panics about

AERO responds to James Ladwig’s critique

AERO’s response is below, with additional comments from Associate Professor Ladwig. For more information about the statistical issues discussed,

AERO’s writing report is causing panic. It’s wrong. Here’s why.

By James Ladwig

If ever there was a time to question public investment in developing reports using  ‘data’ generated by the National Assessment Program, it is now with the release of the Australian Educational Research Organisation’s report ‘Writing development: What does a decade of NAPLAN data reveal?’  I am sure the report was meant to provide reliable diagnostic

Is the NAPLAN results delay about politics or precision?

By Greg Thompson

The decision announced yesterday by ACARA to delay the release of preliminary NAPLAN data is perplexing. The justification

How to fix education: cut tests, defund private schools

In the final part in our series of what the next government should do to save Australian education,

If only we really wanted to solve the problems

By Jim Watterston

Each day this week, EduResearch Matters will publish the views of educational leaders on the state of education

Learning is not a race but politicians think it is. Now wellbeing is in peril.

By George Variyan

Pasi Salhberg is right, we need to prioritise wellbeing during the endless lockdowns many of us are enduring.

Why appeasing Latham won’t make our students any more remarkable

By James Ladwig

Are our schools making the kids we think we should? The tussle between politics and education continues and Latham is just the blunt end of what is now the assumed modus operandi of school policy in Australia.  Many readers of this blog no doubt will have noticed a fair amount of public educational discussion about NSW’s