teacher workload

The education minister’s terrible, horrible, no good, very bad idea*

By Alison Bedford and Naomi Barnes

When will governments learn their lesson? Worksheets won’t fix workload crisis. The teachers of NSW are at breaking

A vital message for teachers everywhere: how to help traumatised students

By Tebeje Molla and Damian Blake

We are constantly exposed to life-threatening events that result in trauma. Natural disasters such as seasonal bushfires and floods have affected millions of Australians. The COVID-19 pandemic has also brought about loss of life, extended isolation, and exposure to increased domestic violence— for some youth, all these events can be traumatic.   Likewise, human-induced traumatic events

The top five ways COVID places harsher burdens on educators. There’s an urgent need for change

By Marg Rogers, Wendy Boyd and Margaret Sims

COVID has caused commotion in the early childhood education and care sector since it arrived in 2020. It made educators  more stressed and added burdens to those already overburdened.  The current level of chaos is unsustainable as shown in our research with Australian directors from long daycare centres, community preschools and family daycare services. Six

Teachers deserve more than love and praise. They deserve a raise.

By Mihajla Gavin, Susan McGrath-Champ, Meghan Stacey and Rachel Wilson

Our second post on the NSW Teachers’ strike It has been 10 years since NSW public sector teachers

The future of teachers’ pay: time to send a better price signal

By John Buchanan

Today we will feature two posts on the NSW Teachers’ strike. This is the first post. At the peak of their careers teachers earn less than electricians, physios, PR people and chiropractors and half that paid to lawyers and finance managers. What we pay people – especially those at the top of their game –

Will the Quality Time Action Plan reduce teacher workload?

By Meghan Stacey, Scott Fitzgerald, Mihajla Gavin, Susan McGrath-Champ and Rachel Wilson

Teachers want more time for lesson planning, not less. Last week, the NSW Department of Education released the Quality Time Action Plan, intended to “simplify administrative practices in schools”. Having highlighted the concerning growth in administrative workload in schools in a report based on a survey of more than 18,000 teachers for the NSW Teachers