educational reform

What does ‘back to basics’ really mean? What ‘reforms’ are being signalled this time?

By Naomi Barnes

Premier Gladys Berejiklian has been describing the NSW curriculum review as a signal to go “back to basics” despite Professor Geoff Masters, who headed up the review, insisting it is more about decluttering the curriculum.  To educators like me the phrase “back to basics” has signalled different education reforms over the years, which begs the

Is this what Dan Tehan means by ‘back to basics’? The Mparntwe Declaration

By Melitta Hogarth

The Mparntwe Declaration was released at the end of last year.  I do not use the official full title of the document on purpose.  I do this as a final hurrah to 2019, the Year of Indigenous Languages and I do this because, as was pointed out, this was the first time a national education

Put professional judgement of teachers first or we’ll never get the systemic education improvements we all want. Let’s talk about it

By James Ladwig

In this blog I’d like to bring together three different lines of educational analysis to show how our

Critical educational reforms and dirty toilets: being honest about blockages and contradictions

By Michael Apple

Large numbers of educators, community activists, and social movements are rightly deeply involved in the struggles for a

NSW Education Standards Authority: is this new authority genuine reform or political spin?

By Nan Bahr and Donna Pendergast

A key recommendation of the recently released Review of the NSW Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards (BOSTES) is a call for “a more risk based approach to the Authority’s regulatory work”. The BOSTES, renamed in the review as the NSW Education Standards Authority, is the authority that governs school education standards in New

Are think tanks having too much influence on Australian schooling policies?

By Glenn C. Savage

The past decade has seen think tanks operate in sophisticated ways to influence the development of Australian schooling

Why condemning international tests is a distraction, and what we really should be worried about

By Des Griffin

Governments all around the world seem to be influenced by the international rankings of students by the Organisation

Education in Australia needs to change direction NOW, before it’s too late

By John Fischetti and Scott Imig

We believe the next five years are vital to the future of education in Australia. As we see

The ‘right’ to government subsidised choice of schools is another wasteful snout-in-the-trough entitlement

By David Zyngier

Parents who choose a private school for their child have a ‘right’ to expect governments to help with the costs because they are taxpayers; so the argument goes in Australia. Certainly chief executive of Independent Schools Victoria, Michelle Green, makes such an argument. But where does this so-called ‘right’ come from? Neither Michelle Green nor

How the budget fails public education and what could be done to fix it

By Stewart Riddle

Once more we have a government short-changing public education. Make no mistake about it, despite promising a ‘unity